Giltine

AB233

Giltine

Region of origin: Lithuania

A goddess of death from traditional Lithuanian folklore, Giltine was said to be a sister to Lamia, goddess of luck, functioning as her opposite and as a Grim Reaper-like figure. Giltine would use her long yellow tongue to lick corpses and build up a toxic coating on it, and then use that toxin to kill the living victims she comes to claim.

Originally posted on Tumblr on April 20, 2016

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Luison

AB217

Luison

Region of origin: Paraguay

The seventh of the seven cursed children of Guaraní mythology, Luison was a god of death and the night; he lived in and guarded cemeteries, fed on dead bodies and appearing to those who were about to die. As European influence reached the Guaraní, Luison gained a more bestial countenance and became more prominently analogous with werewolf stories, replacing his traditional death-god role.

Originally posted on Tumblr on April 4, 2016

Erchitu

AB190

Erchitu

Region of origin: Sardinia

As punishment for wicked behavior or a particular transgression, a person may be cursed to take the form of a giant white ox during the full moon. The ox will be paraded through the streets by a procession of demons and imps before stopping outside a home and bellowing three times, loud enough to be heard across the countryside. An occupant of the house it stops at is said to die within a year of hearing the erchitu. The erchitu will return to their human form the next morning, but methods to break the curse while transformed include blowing out the two candles on its horns at the same time, or cutting off those horns which are said to be as strong as steel.

Originally posted on Tumblr on March 8, 2016

Gytrash

AB169

Gytrash

Region of origin: Northern England

One of the British Isles’ various Black Dogs, the gytrash was less a definitive portent of death than some of its relations, but still rarely a pleasant encounter. It would appear to menace travelers on roads at night and try to lead them off their course. Aside from a dog, it was also supposed to be able to take the form of a black mule or horse, also known as a “shagfoal.”

Originally posted on Tumblr on February 16, 2016

Black Howler

AB141

Black Howler

Region of origin: The Ozarks

The Black Howler or Ozark Howler is a cryptid sighted around the Ozark region, described as a lynx-like cat as big as a bear, with horns and a distinctive guttoral howl that earned it its name. Some more supernatural tellings equate it with the Black Dog myths of the British Isles, a deathly omen for those who draw its attention.

Originally posted on Tumblr on January 19, 2016

Baykok

AB128

Baykok

Region of origin: Great Lakes region, United States and Canada

An emaciated, skeletal figure, the Baykok is an embodiment of death specifically for hunters and warriors of the Ojibwe tribes. He is said to fly through the forest, making a shrill screeching sound, before incapacitating his prey with his club or invisible arrows and, once down, tearing into their torso to eat their livers.

Originally posted on Tumblr on January 6, 2016