Papuan Devil-Pig

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Papuan Devil-Pig

Region of origin: Papua New Guinea

More commonly known as Monckton’s Gazeka, the animal was written about in scientific journals as early as 1875 but most famously reported in 1906 by a local army private who belonged to a party formed by C.A.W. Monckton, an explorer from New Zealand whose work was primarily focused in Papua New Guinea. The private, Ogi, while out looking another man from the party, Oina, would instead find “pig-like” animals which they described as having a tapir’s snout and “a devil’s face”. Ogi panicked and fired upon one of the animals, which took two bullets to the shoulder and fled. Oina would then be the one to find Ogi, left in a state of shock and bring him back from the jungle where he recounted his sighting to Monckton, who confirmed there had been reports of similar animals and strange tracks and leavings on nearby Mount Scratchley. Hearing the description of the animal, later naturalists and cryptozoologists would propose it may have been a surviving parlorchestidae, an otherwise extinct family of marsupials.

The name “Gazeka” actually comes from a British production of the play Les P’tites Michu, which described a fictional animal imagined by a drunken explorer and was applied to Monckton’s devil-pig as a way of mocking these tales of a presumably fantastical creature.

Originally posted on Tumblr on August 11, 2016

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The Ghost Mammoth

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The Ghost Mammoth

Region of origin: Wrangell-St. Elias National Park, Alaska, United States

While shooting the mountainous vistas of the national park, photographer Jill O’Brien heard the sounds of animal behind her. Fearing it was a bear, she turned around slowly found herself facing a small, presumably juvenile, woolly mammoth. Before she could react, the mammoth ran past her and became “enveloped by a black cloud” which retreated into itself, vanishing along with the atavistic entity. Some approach the story as a ghost still haunting its old territory, while others suggest it was a living animal caught in some kind of temporal disturbance.

Originally posted on Tumblr on July 31, 2016

Masbate Monster

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Masbate Monster

Region of origin: Claveria, Masbate Province, The Philippines

The agreed upon details of the Masbate Monster cryptid are the decomposing body of a strange creature washed ashore and was taken by the man who discovered it and sold to a butcher before it could be properly identified. Beyond that, details are murky or contradictory; witnesses gave its size ranging from twenty to forty feet long, and it was alternatively described as cow- or calf-like, a giant eel, a plesiosaur-like animal or a shell-less turtle. Though they were never able to observe the carcass directly, some experts suggest it, like many large globsters, may have been an orca or basking shark, deformed or too badly decomposed to be recognizable.

Originally posted on Tumblr on July 29, 2016

Arica Monster

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Arica Monster

Region of origin: Atacama Desert, Chile

Sighted by motorists on the roads of the deserts of northern Chile, witnesses have described encountering a large, bipedal creature crossing the road and approaching their vehicles. In the early Eighties, it was described as kangaroo-like, then in the Nineties it was said to more conclusively resemble the velociraptors from Jurassic Park, leading cryptozoologists to surmise it may be a surviving dromaeosaur of some kind. However, like the chupacabra turning from a winged reptilian figure to a canid beast as new information was absorbed into the folklore, as our understanding of the dinosaurs themselves changed so too did the Arica monster: those intent on preserving the idea of an extant dinosaur changing their depictions to include feathers and bird-like features while others maintain the earlier accounts of a more distinctly reptilian creature.

Originally posted on Tumblr on July 5, 2016

Mngwa

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Mngwa

Region of origin: Tanzania

A very large cat, even compared to its leopard and lion cousins, said to stalk the tall grasses of eastern Africa; local stories of the mngwa or nunda attacking people in the night have existed for hundreds of years and first came to the attention of British explorers in the late 1800s. Theories range from it being a separate species to a subspecies or mutation of a leopard or golden cat resulting in a larger body and unique coloration, or even an extant species of ancient tiger or machairodus. It has been proposed the nandi bear, another east African cryptid predator, and the mngwa might be one and the same creature.

Originally posted on Tumblr on June 28, 2016

Ngoubou

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Ngoubou

Region of origin: Cameroon

In late 2000, researchers hunting down leads of the Mokele-mbembe learned from tribes they spoke to of another potential cryptid in the area: the ngoubou, a local word for “rhinoceros,” but also described as a similar but different horned animal, larger and with a frill of six horns around the back of its head. Members of the tribe provided them with a drawing that greatly resembled a styracosaurus, and that one had been killed by the tribe’s hunters as recently as the lifetime of the previous generation, but noted that the population had been in decline and encountering the creatures had become increasingly rare.

Originally posted on Tumblr on June 15, 2016

Pukehina Predator

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Pukehina Predator

Region of origin: Pukehina Beach, New Zealand

A strange, large marine animal whose body had washed up on the shores of northern New Zealand. Heavily decayed, identification was difficult; based on photographic evidence it was suggested by researchers it could most likely be an orca but many maintain that it more resembled a species of basilosaurus, an extinct genus of proto-whales.

Originally posted on Tumblr on June 5, 2016