Daimajin

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Daimajin

Region of origin: Japan

Literally “Giant Demon God”, Daimajin is a massive stone statue inhabited by the spirit of a vanquished demon king, Arakatsuma, who has been kept dormant by the prayers of the inhabitants of a nearby village, his struggles against his imprisonment manifesting as occasional earthquakes. When compelled by the villagers or the statue is put under physical assault, the spirit can animate the statue and wreak havoc throughout the region, often destroying the forces of some evil warlord but also proving to not be particularly discriminate about what or who gets trampled once awakened, although it seems to show some leniency towards children or the pure of heart. After his purpose has been served, the statue will return to normal there are instances of Arakatsuma turning into a hitodama-like ball of fire before flying away, but he seems to remain bound to the statue. Despite being a carved idol, Daimajin is shown to capable of bleeding even in its dormant stage and some promotional material shows it possessing a strange array of organs and nerves.

[Sources referenced: X | X ]

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Oboroguruma

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Oboroguruma

Region of origin: Kyoto, Japan

Originally included in images as a part of yokai processions, the faced oxcarts persisted as a visual element without any real lore attached to them until the 18th Century when Toriyama Sekien added them to his yokai bestiaries. By his writings, the rich patrons (and their drivers) of Kyoto would clash constantly over parking their carts, until their rage over being denied prestigious spots would inhabit the cart itself and manifest as a tsukumogami. These living carts would roll up outside homes on foggy nights and beckon the residents to go for a ride.

Originally posted on Tumblr on May 3, 2016

Biwa-Bokuboku

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Biwa-Bokuboku

Region of origin: Japan

A genial sort of spirit, the Biwa-Bokuboku is a tsukumogami born of a discarded Biwa lute given anthropomorphic form. Stories place him wandering around as a busker, living a solitary life in abandoned buildings or partying it up with other yokai, usually heard at nights playing himself, dancing loudly and singing songs about the neglect he felt from his former owners.

Originally posted on Tumblr on May 1, 2016

Bakezori

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Bakezori

Region of origin: Japan

A tsukumogami of a sandal, at age 100 the footwear gains limbs, a mouth and a single eye, and out of boredom or spite it tends to utilize it’s newfound motility primarily to annoy; running around its home at night stomping, yelling, and nipping at the human inhabitants. Alternatively it may decide to set out on its own and, as most footwear is wont to do, go missing.

Originally posted on Tumblr on April 29, 2016

Chochin-Obake

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Chochin-Obake

Region of origin: Japan

A tsukumogami, the class of yokai who are inanimate objects given life, the chochin-Obake is a paper lantern that after 100 years of existence gains a soul and sentience. As with most yokai, they are harmless pranksters, reveling in spooking humans but not out to inflict any real injury.

Originally posted on Tumblr on April 27, 2016

Bhuta Vahana Yanta

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Bhuta Vahana Yanta

Region of origin: Magadha, India

“Spirit movement machines,” the bhuta vahana yanta were mechanical guards based on designs stolen from ancient Roman engineers (by way of a reincarnation-based heist) and used by the king Ajatashatru to protect the vaults where he stored the relics of the Buddha. The Lokapannatti tells of the hero and emperor Ashoka, with the help of the engineer who built them, facing down and disarming the machines to retrieve the relics.

Originally posted on Tumblr on March 18, 2016