Oboroguruma

AB246

Oboroguruma

Region of origin: Kyoto, Japan

Originally included in images as a part of yokai processions, the faced oxcarts persisted as a visual element without any real lore attached to them until the 18th Century when Toriyama Sekien added them to his yokai bestiaries. By his writings, the rich patrons (and their drivers) of Kyoto would clash constantly over parking their carts, until their rage over being denied prestigious spots would inhabit the cart itself and manifest as a tsukumogami. These living carts would roll up outside homes on foggy nights and beckon the residents to go for a ride.

Originally posted on Tumblr on May 3, 2016

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Mokumokuren

AB245

Mokumokuren

Region of origin: Japan

A staple of Japanese haunted houses, the Mokumokuren are dilapidated shoji doors that, as they fall apart with age and grow holes, become infested by pairs of ghostly, staring eyes. The eyes will act as spies for the other yokai denizens of the house but otherwise are considered largely harmless. However, some stories tell of those daring to sleep under the gaze of the Mokumokuren waking up to find their own eyes missing, possibly added to the door’s collection.

Originally posted on Tumblr on May 2, 2016

Biwa-Bokuboku

AB244

Biwa-Bokuboku

Region of origin: Japan

A genial sort of spirit, the Biwa-Bokuboku is a tsukumogami born of a discarded Biwa lute given anthropomorphic form. Stories place him wandering around as a busker, living a solitary life in abandoned buildings or partying it up with other yokai, usually heard at nights playing himself, dancing loudly and singing songs about the neglect he felt from his former owners.

Originally posted on Tumblr on May 1, 2016

Kurayarou

AB243

Kurayarou

Region of origin: Japan

When a mounted warrior falls in battle, his saddle may carry on the fight in his stead. A consumate warrior, the kurayarou (literally “saddle rascal”), either in deference to or directly inhabited by the spirit of its fallen owner, will pick up sticks or anything else handy and continue fighting whatever crosses it’s path.

Originally posted on Tumblr on April 30, 2016

Bakezori

AB242

Bakezori

Region of origin: Japan

A tsukumogami of a sandal, at age 100 the footwear gains limbs, a mouth and a single eye, and out of boredom or spite it tends to utilize it’s newfound motility primarily to annoy; running around its home at night stomping, yelling, and nipping at the human inhabitants. Alternatively it may decide to set out on its own and, as most footwear is wont to do, go missing.

Originally posted on Tumblr on April 29, 2016

Chochin-Obake

AB240

Chochin-Obake

Region of origin: Japan

A tsukumogami, the class of yokai who are inanimate objects given life, the chochin-Obake is a paper lantern that after 100 years of existence gains a soul and sentience. As with most yokai, they are harmless pranksters, reveling in spooking humans but not out to inflict any real injury.

Originally posted on Tumblr on April 27, 2016