Spriggan

ABC031

Spriggan

Region of origin: Cornwall, England, UK

Small sprite-like Cornish fae related to piskies and knockers, spriggans have earned a more violent reputation than their cousins but function more in a protective role than a malicious one, acting as bodyguards to the other fair folk or guardians of castle ruins and barrows and the treasures within. Despite their small stature, spriggans are believed to be the ghosts of ancient giants and can grow to massive sizes, as well as perform an array of magical tricks such as causing bad weather, failed crops and illnesses or leading people astray similar to an ignis fatuus.

[Sources referenced: X | X | X | X ]

Advertisements

Abaia

AB407

Abaia

Region of origin: Melanesia

While the exact location varies within different stories and tribes, there is said to be a lake within the Melanesian region abundant with aquatic life and at the bottom of that lake lives Abaia, a giant eel who functions as the sea creatures’ guardian. Anyone who fishes from that lake or otherwise harms the animals in it will be met with Abaia’s wrath, as she thrashes about causing great waves to overwhelm and drown the person. In some versions, Abaia has some magical control over the weather itself. When a man discovers the bountiful lake and brings the people of his village to help catch as many fish as possible, Abaia summons a massive rainstorm that floods the village and drowns all the villagers who had taken a fish from the lake.

Originally posted on Tumblr on November 10, 2016

Odei

AB397

Odei

Region of origin: Basque Country, Pyrenees

Used today as a generic term for bad or stormy weather, Odei or Hodei was a sky-spirit and the personification of thunderstorms, who set out to frighten humans and damage crops. He was said to be able to be calmed down or warded off by performing rituals such as burning laurel branches or placing an upturned axe at the entrance to your home.

Originally posted on Tumblr on October 20, 2016

Wandjina

AB332

Wandjina

Region of origin: Kimberly, Western Australia

Creator deities of the Mowanjum people, the wandjina were said to arrive to the Dreamtime from the clouds and crafted the earth and the beings that lived there. They taught humanity things it needed to survive, but could also bring punishment in the form of harsh weather. When they were done, they prepared to leave into the earth and under the sea, leaving paintings of themselves on caves in the region which have since been maintained by the indigenous people. From the stories of the “sky beings” descending from the heavens and the paintings’ resemblance to the modern stereotypical depiction of an alien, the wandjina are often held up as a possible example of “ancient astronauts” who visited earth and encountered humans early in their development.

Originally posted on Tumblr on July 28, 2016

Shachihoko

AB329

Shachihoko

Region of origin: Japan

With suspected ties to the Hindu Makara and the orca, the shachihoko is a giant tiger-carp said to have control over the weather, specifically the summoning of rain. Statues of them are placed on buildings and temples to function as a guardian against fire damage.

Originally posted on Tumblr on July 25, 2016

Sabawaelnu

AB265

Sabawaelnu

Region of origin: Mi’kmaq tribes, northeastern North America

“Water people,” otherwise known as the Halfway People, were mermaid-like water spirits who held some sway over the weather and could bring storms. Their songs could be used to predict the weather by people who had learned to understand them. The sabawaelnu were generally well-natured but could become vengeful when wronged.

Originally posted on Tumblr on May 22, 2016

Ysätters-Kajsa

AB249

Ysätters-Kajsa

Region of origin: Närke, Sweden

A wind-troll who lived in the plains and mountains around the Närke province, Ysätters-Kajsa was a good-natured but mischievous presence in the lives of nearby villagers. Weather events from building up high snowdrifts or heavy fogs making travel difficult to simply winds blowing off a hat were written off as her making trouble but she was never treated as anything but a playful neighboring spirit. When the winds met and created whirlwinds on the open plains of Närke, it was said Ysätters-Kajsa was out in the middle of them, dancing.

Originally posted on Tumblr on May 5, 2016